Marketing Copywriting: Why ‘Just The Facts’ Won’t Cut It

Most entrepreneurs don’t want to hear this.

But in good faith, and for your own good, I have to say it:

You must be persuasive in your marketing…and probably to a greater degree than you’re naturally comfortable with.

Why? Because people (in other words, your prospects) generally don’t want to change.

Blame it on inertia, or being too busy, or only seeing the cost, or whatever…

…but whatever the reason, the reality is that if you just present the logical facts…

or even just tell them your features and benefits

…and then expect your prospect to immediately do the logical thing…

…well, you’re setting yourself up for conversion rates far, far lower than what you could get.

And that means poorer ROI than necessary.

And I know you don’t want that!

Don’t Just Take My Word For It

Here’s what top direct-response copywriter John Carlton says on this subject.

The best way to accurately think of your prospect’s likelihood and motivation to respond to your offer is to imagine your prospect as:

“…a gigantic somnambulant sloth, spread out on the couch, loathe to move his sleeping bulk, phone just out of reach.”

And then there’s what legendary copywriter Claude Hopkins wrote decades ago in Scientific Advertising:

“…the great point is to get immediate action. People are naturally dilatory. They postpone, and a postponed action is too often forgotten. Do something if possible to get immediate action. Offer some inducement for it. Or tell what delay may cost. Note how many successful selling letters place a limit on an offer. It expires on a certain date. That is all done to get a prompt decision, to overcome the tendency to delay.”

In other words, you gotta push!

Your Copywriting Bottom Line

Look, you know your product or service will help your readers if they consume it.

And that’s exactly why you owe it to them — and yourself — to be willing to push them out of their complacency

…even if that means making them temporarily uncomfortable about their current situation and provoking them to act now.

Levels Of Copywriting Persuasiveness

That said, what level of OVERALL persuasiveness are you comfortable with for your marketing?

It helps to have a sense of the amount of persuasiveness you want to use in your marketing copywriting.

And to help answer that question, I’ve provided 3 versions of a bit of marketing copy below:

  • Level A is a direct copy/paste from a GKIC salesletter from master marketer himself, Dave Dee.
  • Level B is a rewritten version of Level A that I wrote to be less persuasive than Level A
  • Level C is another rewritten version of Level A that I wrote to be less persuasive than Level B

You’ll see that the differences in wording between Levels A, B and C are really quite subtle…but the overall change in tone is significant.

Here are those samples…

3 Persuasive Copywriting Levels

LEVEL A:

“Most people procrastinate away all their opportunity. They get on a treadmill and run in place until, finally, they die. And most act as if taking up a matter next year is just the same as now. It isn’t.”

LEVEL B:

“Most people procrastinate away their opportunities. They just stay on their familiar treadmill and run in place, day after day after day. They tell themselves taking up a matter next year is just the same as now. It isn’t.”

LEVEL C:

“Many people let procrastination rob them of their opportunities. They stay on their familiar treadmill and run in place, day after day. They tell themselves taking up a matter next year is just the same as now…but it isn’t.”

Which Level For Your Marketing Copy?

Obviously Dave Dee would go with Level A’s persuasiveness…but that’s because he knows it produces results with the market and prospects he was writing for.

What about your market and prospects? Would you go with Level A, B or C? Let us know your thoughts in the comments below…so we can all become better marketers!